What type of doctor treats dysphagia

Depending on the suspected cause, your health care provider might refer you to an ear, nose and throat specialist, a doctor who specializes in treating digestive disorders (gastroenterologist), or a doctor who specializes in diseases of the nervous system (neurologist).

Does a gastroenterologist treat dysphagia?

Whereas oropharyngeal dysphagia is treated by neurologists or ENT physicians, diagnostic and treatment of esophageal dysphagia is a challenging role for gastroenterologists.

Do ENT doctors treat dysphagia?

When dysphagia is frequent, and the cause is not clear, your ENT specialist will discuss the history of your problem and examine your mouth and throat. They may insert a small tube called a flexible laryngoscope through your nose to help them examine your throat in greater detail.

Who can diagnose dysphagia?

  • Speech and language pathologist, a health care provider that specializes in diagnosing and treating speech, language, and communication disorders.
  • An otolaryngologist, a doctor who specializes in diagnosing and treating disorders of the ear, nose, and throat.

What is the most common cause of dysphagia?

Acid reflux disease is the most common cause of dysphagia. People with acid reflux may have problems in the esophagus, such as an ulcer, a stricture (narrowing of the esophagus), or less likely a cancer causing difficulty swallowing.

Can dysphagia go away?

Dysphagia is a another medical name for difficulty swallowing. This symptom isn’t always indicative of a medical condition. In fact, this condition may be temporary and go away on its own.

How do you fix dysphagia?

  1. Exercises for your swallowing muscles. If you have a problem with your brain, nerves, or muscles, you may need to do exercises to train your muscles to work together to help you swallow. …
  2. Changing the foods you eat. …
  3. Dilation. …
  4. Endoscopy. …
  5. Surgery. …
  6. Medicines.

Can dysphagia be caused by anxiety?

But difficulty swallowing is a common anxiety symptom, especially during anxiety attacks. It’s important to note that trouble swallowing may be a sign of other disorders, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease.

What are three disorders that cause dysphagia?

  • a stroke.
  • neurological conditions that cause damage to the brain and nervous system over time, including Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, dementia, and motor neurone disease.
  • brain tumours.
  • myasthenia gravis – a rare condition that causes your muscles to become weak.
What are the signs that a person may have dysphagia?
  • Pain while swallowing.
  • Inability to swallow.
  • A sensation of food getting stuck in the throat or chest or behind the breastbone (sternum)
  • Drooling.
  • Hoarseness.
  • Food coming back up (regurgitation)
  • Frequent heartburn.
  • Food or stomach acid backing up into the throat.
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What are the stages of dysphagia?

  • Oral preparatory phase. During this phase, you chew your food to a size, shape, and consistency that can be swallowed. …
  • Pharyngeal phase. Here, the muscles of your pharynx contract in sequence. …
  • Esophageal phase. The muscles in your esophagus contract in sequence to move the bolus toward your stomach.

What medications can cause dysphagia?

Drug classes that may contribute to difficulty swallowing include neuroleptics, chemotherapy agents, antihypertensives, tricyclic antidepressants, anticholinergics, antihistamines, antiparkinsonian agents, and other drugs that impair saliva production.

What are the most common complications of dysphagia?

  • Coughing and choking. If you have dysphagia, there’s a risk of food, drink or saliva going down the “wrong way”. …
  • Aspiration pneumonia. …
  • Dysphagia in children.

Does dysphagia get worse?

Dysphagia can come and go, be mild or severe, or get worse over time. If you have dysphagia, you may: Have problems getting food or liquids to go down on the first try. Gag, choke, or cough when you swallow.

Is dysphagia a neurological disorder?

Having trouble swallowing (dysphagia) is a symptom that accompanies a number of neurological disorders. The problem can occur at any stage of the normal swallowing process as food and liquid move from the mouth, down the back of the throat, through the esophagus and into the stomach.

Can sinus problems cause difficulty swallowing?

These patients are bothered by the sensation of excess throat mucus or a lump in the throat. They may also be experiencing throat clearing, non-productive cough, intermittent hoarseness and difficulty swallowing.

Can dysphagia be psychological?

Dysphagia patients displaying symptoms indicative of depression, isolation and denial of their condition can sometimes experience psychological, social and physical damage.

When should I be worried about trouble swallowing?

You should see your doctor to determine the cause of your swallowing difficulties. Call a doctor right away if you’re also having trouble breathing or think something might be stuck in your throat. If you have sudden muscle weakness or paralysis and can’t swallow at all, call 911 or go to the emergency room.

What is pharyngeal phase dysphagia?

During this phase, called the pharyngeal phase, the larynx (voice box) closes tightly and breathing stops to prevent food or liquid from entering the airway and lungs. The third stage begins when food or liquid enters the esophagus, the tube that carries food and liquid to the stomach.

What is the difference between dysphagia and dysphasia?

Dysphagia was defined as difficulty swallowing any liquid (including saliva) or solid material. Dysphasia was defined as speech disorders in which there was impairment of the power of expression by speech, writing, or signs or impairment of the power of comprehension of spoken or written language.

Can you live with dysphagia?

Living with dysphagia isn’t just a medical risk, but can also hamper one’s quality of life and mental health.

What is a swallow specialist?

A Speech-Language Pathologist (SLP) is an expert in assessing swallowing disorders and establishing a treatment plan to improve the swallow. Your doctor or the SLP may recommend having a Modified Barium Swallow (MBS) evaluation where your swallow is viewed under x-ray to see how food or liquid is moving.

Why do Slps treat dysphagia?

Speech-language pathologists involved in the management of patients with dysphagia provide services that include evaluation, diagnosis, and rehabilitation. Dysphagia is a swallowing disorder that may be due to various neurological, structural, and cognitive deficits.

How is dysphagia treated in the elderly?

Patients can be treated for oropharyngeal dysphagia by using compensatory interventions, including behavioral changes, oral care, dietary modification, or rehabilitative interventions such as exercises and therapeutic oral trials.

Can omeprazole cause swallowing problems?

Omeprazole may cause a serious type of allergic reaction when used in patients with conditions treated with antibiotics. Call your doctor right away if you or your child has itching, trouble breathing or swallowing, or any swelling of your hands, face, or mouth.

Does gabapentin cause dysphagia?

The association of gabapentin with dysphagia has been seen in literature, clinical trials and post-marketing reports. Gabapentin potentially causes dysphagia by depressing the central nervous system (CNS) which may lead to reduced awareness, reduced control of the voluntary muscle and difficulty to initiate a swallow.

What are 4 complications of dysphagia?

The most common complications of dysphagia are aspiration pneumonia, malnutrition and dehydration; other possible complications, such as intellectual and body development deficit in children with dysphagia, or emotional impairment and social restriction have not been studied thoroughly.

Can people with dysphagia swallow pills?

Swallowing tablets is difficult for many patients with dysphagia. Recent surveys suggest up to 40% of the general population may have difficulties swallowing pills or tablets. Some information on the esophageal transit of pills is available,9 but the oropharyngeal aspects of pill swallowing have not been studied.

What is respiratory dysphagia?

• The term is used to describe an inability to eat and/or drink. • The muscles involved in swallowing and breathing have dual roles; problems with one. can cause difficulty with the other. • Risks associated with dysphagia include aspiration (food going down the wrong way.

How long does it take to recover from dysphagia?

Studies show that most individuals with dysphagia recover within two weeks. However, every stroke is different and therefore every recovery will be different. Sometimes dysphagia goes away on its own, a phenomenon called spontaneous recovery.

What is a swallowing test?

A swallowing study is a test that shows what your throat and esophagus do while you swallow. The test uses X-rays in real time (fluoroscopy) and records what happens when you swallow. While you swallow, the doctor and speech pathologist watch a video screen.